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Florida Marchman Act: What You Need to Know

a woman discusses the florida marchman act with a friend

The Florida Marchman Act is one of many influential laws that help protect the citizens of Florida. The act is designed to provide a structured process for involuntary assessment and stabilization of individuals with substance abuse disorders. In many cases, the Marchman Act can be used in conjunction with the Baker Act, which covers involuntary mental health commitment. If you have a Florida Marchman Act FAQ, we have answers. Contact the drug and alcohol detox and treatment center at Footprints Beachside Recovery today by calling 727.513.5972 or using our convenient online form.

What Is the Florida Marchman Act?

The Florida Marchman Act is a law that provides for involuntary assessment and stabilization for individuals with substance abuse disorders. It is named after State Senator Frank Marchman, who was instrumental in getting the law passed in 1993. The act allows for a court to order an individual to undergo assessment and stabilization for substance abuse disorders. This can be done if the individual is a danger to themselves or others or if they are unable to care for themselves.

The act allows for two different types of involuntary assessment and stabilization: inpatient and outpatient. Inpatient assessment and stabilization is when the individual is placed in a treatment facility, such as a hospital or detox center, for a period of time. Outpatient assessment and stabilization are when the individual receives treatment while living in their own home or in a sober living facility.

In order to be involuntarily committed under the Florida Marchman Act, there must be a finding of probable cause. This means that there must be some evidence to show that the individual is a danger to themselves or others or that they are unable to care for themselves. Once probable cause is found, a court order can be issued for the individual to undergo assessment and stabilization.

If you have been involuntarily committed under the law, you have the right to an attorney. You also have the right to a hearing, where you can contest the commitment.

Florida Marchman Act FAQs

Many people have questions about this law. We have answered a few of the most common Florida Marchman Act FAQs below.

How Long Can an Individual Be Involuntarily Committed Under the Florida Marchman Act?

An individual can be involuntarily committed for up to 90 days.

Can an Individual Be Involuntarily Committed More than Once Under the Florida Marchman Act?

Yes, an individual can be involuntarily committed more than once.

What Happens if an Individual Does Not Comply with the Florida Marchman Act?

If an individual does not comply with the terms of their involuntary commitment, police can take them into custody and bring them back to court.

What Is the Difference Between the Florida Marchman Act and the Baker Act?

The Florida Marchman Act is for the involuntary assessment and stabilization of individuals with substance abuse disorders. The Baker Act is for involuntary mental health commitment.

Contact Footprints Beachside Recovery to Learn More

Whether you’re looking for a treatment center for yourself or someone you love, Footprints Beachside Recovery can help. Our treatment center near Tampa, Florida is here to provide you with the resources and support you need to overcome addiction. We offer a variety of treatment options, including detox, outpatient care, and sober living services. We also have a wide range of support services, such as:

  • Individual therapy
  • Group therapy
  • Family counseling
  • Biosound therapy
  • Yoga therapy

You don’t have to watch as your loved one suffers from addiction. Through the Florida Marchman Act, you can get them the help they need. If you have any questions about our treatment center, please don’t hesitate to contact us today. We’re here to help you through this difficult time. Call 727.513.5972 to learn more about how we can help.